#1month1park: Prinzessinnengärten, Berlin, Germany.

visual_princessengarten

 

Located at Moritzplatz in the district of Kreuzberg, Prinzessinnengärten is as Berlin as Berlin can be. This mobile garden provides the perfect “green” escape from the concrete city in which it dwells. Once inside, you immediately feel you have stepped back in time – as nothing immediately makes sense. But once you look closely, you realize everything is simply built to sustain – the aesthetics seem to be an afterthought, if a thought at all.

Much like Berlin.

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Entrance

Walkway from entrance

Walkway from entrance

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Play Area/Library

As a former brownfield site between Prinzenstrasse and Oranienstrasse, the area of today’s garden lay fallow for over 60 years. But in 2009, the non-profit organization Nomadic Green – which was made up of local residents – transformed the space into a mobile urban vegetable garden.

 

Recycled water tanks

Recycled water tanks

Plants grown in rice sacks

Plants grown in rice sacks

The area consists of recycled containers, bakery boxes, Tetra Packs and rice sacks – so the garden is always mobile.

Plants watered and grown in recycled Tetra Packs

Plants watered and grown in recycled Tetra Packs

People sit among the plants

People sit among the plants

 

The aim of all this is to convert unused city land into productive green spaces, where people can come together to create, learn and relax – all within a sustainable environment. The Berlin Senate Department for Urban Development also views the garden as a successful example of gender mainstreaming in urban development.

Enjoying a beer in the garden

Enjoying a beer in the garden

Perennial Sector

Perennial Sector

Beehive

Beehive

But the best part of the garden is that it welcomes everyone and provides the perfect atmosphere to relax, work, play, drink, eat and create.

Main seating area in the center of the garden

Main seating area in the center of the garden

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During my trip to Prinzessinnengärten, I stumbled upon a “Tiny House” being built by a collective of around 6 people. When asked what they were doing, I was told they wanted to show that – with a simple design – anyone can build The Nest, which is a small house from wood. You do not have to be a carpenter, you do not have to be an architect – all you need are some work clothes.

The Nest – in progress

The Nest – in progress

The Project Manager, Hendrik Rauf Man, made it clear that everyone was welcome to help – even me. As of now, there are around 20 different people working on the house, who come and go as they please. They have been working on the house for about 2.5 weeks now and will most likely be finished in another two.

The project, which has been named Wieder Wild, is pushing for fully self-sufficient products, such as this house, with low cost and do-it-yourself technology – making it an independent and nature friendly home.

Hendrik Rauf Man, Project Manager, taking a break on the roof

Hendrik Rauf Man, Project Manager, taking a break on the roof

Until next time…visit prinzessinnengarten.net and wiederwild.org to learn more!

Until next time…visit prinzessinnengarten.net and wiederwild.org to learn more!

 

Nadia

 

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#1month1park is Beirut Green Project’s latest blog section, where we will be featuring one park a month from across the globe. These blog posts are written by residents of cities around the world who enjoy using their parks and are eager to share their experiences with us.
The purpose of this activity is to showcase some of beautiful parks from around the globe, to get inspired by some of their unique features and solutions, and to highlight the significance and vital need for these spaces for a healthy city life.

 

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